Saturday May 20th

BENITO QUINQUELA MARTIN AND THE ARGENTINE ARTISTIC VANGUARDS OF THE 1920-30s
Adriana Piastrellini, President, Art Deco Argentina

This presentation will review the historic context for three Argentine Artistic Vanguards during the Art Deco era, when Modernists made a radical break from established artistic traditions. There will be a focus on Benito Quinquela Martin, whose colorful work reflects the activity and vigor of life around ships and ports.

PREVIEW OF THE 15TH WORLD CONGRESS ON ART DECO: BUENOS AIRES
Adriana Piastrellini, President, Art Deco Argentina

There is a large concentration of Art Deco architecture in Akron, Ohio. The city prospered during the Art Deco period with industries related to rubber and aeronautics.

HUNTINGTON BANK TOWER (1931)
106 South Main Street
Architects: Walker & Weeks

At 330 feet (100.6 meters) this is Akron’s tallest building.

OHIO BELL BUILDING (now AT&T Building) (1929)
50 West Bowery Street
Architect: unknown

(Former) YMCA BUILDING (1931)
1 Canal Square Plaza (Bowery & Center Streets)
Architects: Good & Wagner

This was the largest YMCA in the country when it was built: 220 dorm rooms, a 24-hour medical clinic, two restaurants were included on the property, as well as Ohio’s largest swimming pool and extensive exercise facilities. In 2010, the YMCA abandoned the building for a new facility. The upper floors have been renovated as apartments.

POLSKY BUILDING (Former A. Polsky Company) (1930)
225 South Main Street
Architects: Starret & VanVleck

It’s remarkable that this upscale department store in Akron, Ohio selected the same firm that designed the Lord & Taylor and Saks Fifth Avenue stores in NYC. The building appears to be “frosted” with layers of geometric terra cotta “icing.” The store went bankrupt in 1978. The building is now used by the University of Akron.

MAYFLOWER APARTMENTS (Formerly the Mayflower Hotel) (1931)
263 South Main Street
Architects: Graham, Anderson, Probst, & White.

BLUE, A GOODWILL BOUTIQUE
335 South Main Street

This is a “curated” collection from Goodwill, selected from the best of their donations. You may find a vintage treasure! It’s well organized, with knowledgeable staff to help with your selections. Stacy, the manager, will offer coupons or discounts for our group.

AKRON-BEACON JOURNAL BUILDING (1930)
44 East Exchange Street
Architects: Howell & Thomas

Naturally, the Beacon building has an Art Deco 3-tiered corner tower.

GUGGENHEIM AIRSHIP INSTITUTE (1932)
1300 Triplett Boulevard
Architect: Michael M. Konarski

The Institute was a collaboration of the Engineering School of the University of Akron, the Goodyear-Zeppelin Corporation, the Guggenheim Fund for Aeronautics, and the California Institute of Technology. The building is abandoned, and used annually as a “haunted house” around Halloween. At the back of the building is a terra-cotta angel holding an airship! The Institute closed in 1949 as the use of airships diminished.

AKRON-FULTON AIRPORT TERMINAL (1931)
1800 Triplett Boulevard
Architects: O.C. Harbaugh & Michael M. Konarski

With cream-colored brick and terra-cotta detailing in pastel colors, this lovely terminal was originally intended for passengers waiting for airships, not airplanes. The Goodyear Airlock, where the first American air ships were built, is nearby. This facility was used until 1962, when a larger airport was constructed south. It was later used for a restaurant which closed in 2005. Entrepreneur Randy Theken restored the building for his company’s headquarters, and won an award from Heritage Ohio for the “best commercial rehabilitation in 2011.”